Music is in our DNA (Your Curated Music Playlist Here!)

 

 

via GIPHY

We hope you’re still enjoying the music high we got from our segment with Dr. Portia K. Maultsby last week. We learned that music really is in our DNA and that our music -- music that comes from African culture has literally empowered and set the tone for so many genres that we know and love today.

 

See her chart below:

The Evolution of African American Music chart by Dr. Portia K Maultsby

As promised, she didn’t leave us without a dope beat to step to! 😉  

Below she shared curated Black Music Month playlist to enjoy. Her list takes us through a journey of African American history. It starts in the era of slavery and continues through more present-day music, in what we can call the Black Lives Matter Era. 

Turn your speakers up! Get moving and grooving. 

Keep count – how many of these songs do you know? 

 

via GIPHY

 

The Era of Slavery 

 

Jim Crow Era

 

Civil Rights Era 

See also:

Juxtaposition and intersection of "Civil Rights" and "Black Power"

 Black Power ideology spreads among youth/young adults

 

Additional suggested songs:

Post Civil-Rights / Era of Desegregation: Funk as Social Commentary

In this segment, Dr. Maultsby also shared:

 

and

 

Black Lives Matter

 

Also in this segment, Kendrick Lamar's "Alright".

Wendi, our African Ancestry Hypewoman and LIVE producer shared ⭐ her pick, too: Liberation (Outkast featuring Cee-lo)

How did y'all feel about this playlist? Some hits, right?! Let us know which one(s) were the most meaningful to you! 

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By Bria Baylor 2 Comments SHARE
  • Gwen C. on

    Nina Simone song: Mississippi Goddamn still has relevance today! Sad history- so many nameless, faceless, forgotten people who fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi during the 60s. Lots of folks still standing up for equality and justice!

  • Gwen C. on

    Nina Simone song: Mississippi Goddamn still has relevance today! Sad history- so many nameless, faceless, forgotten people who fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi during the 60s. Lots of folks still standing up for equality and justice!


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